Glossary of Terms

General Addiction Terms

Addiction: Substance dependence occurs when individuals continue to use drugs and/or alcohol, even when they are experiencing significant problems related to their use. Learn more about addiction.

Recovery: In 2011, as part of its Recovery Support Strategic Initiative, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) proposed the following working definition of recovery: “A process of change through which individuals work to improve their own health and well-being, live a self-directed life, and strive to achieve their full potential.” Learn more about recovery.

Relapse: A return to chemical use after a period of no chemical use. It does not always happen in recovery, but is common. Learn more about relapse.

Co-Occurring Disorders: Having more than one clinical disorder. For example, having both chemical health issues and mental health issues. Other common co-occurring disorders are gambling addictions, eating disorders, sex addictions, internet addictions, spending issues, etc.

Dual Disorders: Another term for Co-Occurring disorder.

 

Levels of Treatment Services

High-Intensity Residential/In-Patient: Treatment services that typically offer a minimum of 30 hours of treatment services weekly and room and board. Residents of these programs are usually not given much, if any, free time away from the program. Some of these programs can be hospital based and some may be in locked facilities (Progress Valley is not hospital based or locked). Residents new to Progress Valley may be in this level of care depending on what they were doing prior to coming to Progress Valley.

Medium-Intensity Residential/Extended Care: Treatment services that typically offer between 15 and 30 hours of treatment services weekly and room and board. These programs typically are involved for longer lengths of stay (60 or more days) and are usually given some free time away from the program based on their progress on treatment plans. Many Progress Valley residential clients would be in this level of care.

Low-Intensity Residential/Halfway House Care: Treatment services that typically offer fewer than 15 hours of treatment services per week and room and board. Commercial insurance plans will often not cover this level of care because it is seen as focusing more on housing rather than clinical services. Progress Valley clients that are transitioning out of residential services may fall into this category of care.

Outpatient/Intensive Outpatient: Treatment services that can vary by number of hours of participation each week based on client need. Clients come to the treatment location from their home location. Intensive Outpatient programs may offer a lodging component that is paid separately from treatment.

Sober Housing/Transitional Housing: Housing secured by people wishing to live in a sober environment. Some sober housing residences (like Progress Valley’s) are operated by treatment centers, but most are owned and operated by recovering people. Most sober housing residences are self-paid monthly, but some programs receive funding from the county for each tenant (GRH programs). Sober Housing residences can vary widely in the amount of structure and supervision offered at the facility.

 

Types of Treatment Funding

Rule 25: Technically, Rule 25 relates to the requirements of the chemical health assessment required by the State of Minnesota for residents that will be receiving state funding for treatment services. However, in practice, Rule 25 is also referred as the funding that the State agrees to pay for Minnesota residents that meet income and clinical eligibility requirements.

Medicaid/Medical Assistance/MN-Care/PMAP: A state funded insurance program for low-income individuals or families. Depending on the type of plan that a person is on, you may have different eligibility/benefits for chemical dependency treatment and there will be different procedures that you need to follow to get enrolled in a treatment program. Progress Valley’s intake counselors can assist you with determining the type of insurance that you are on and the procedures for admitting to a treatment program. 

Medicare: a federal health insurance program available to qualified people over 65 or with some disabilities. Progress Valley is NOT a Medicare provider.

Commercial Health Insurance: Commercial Health insurance is usually paid for through a person’s employer (or, if they are a dependent of someone else, that person’s employer). Commercial insurance can also be purchased by an individual or family. Benefits and treatment eligibility vary widely between commercial plans and assistance is usually needed to determine if Progress Valley services will be covered under any particular plan. Please contact the intake counselors or insurance provider for assistance.

 

Licensing/Credentialing Boards

Rule 31: Progress Valley is licensed by the State of Minnesota as a treatment facility. We are subject to the rules of Rule 31. For the law in its entirety, please link here.

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF):  an independent, international, non-profit organization that works with programs to improve their operations in an effort to improve client outcomes. Learn more about CARF.

Supervised Living Facility (SLF): A licensure issued by the MN Department of Health. Learn more. 

Minneapolis Board and Lodge License: Licensure issued by the City of Minneapolis.

 

Therapeutic Modalities Terms

Co-Occurring Disorders: Having more than one clinical disorder. For example, having both chemical health issues and mental health issues. Other common co-occurring disorders are gambling addictions, eating disorders, sex addictions, internet addictions, spending issues, etc.

Dual Disorders: Another term for Co-Occurring disorder.

Motivational Interviewing (MI): Developed by Miller and Rollnick, Motivational Interviewing focuses on exploring and resolving ambivalence to elicit and strengthen motivation for change. It is considered a best practice in chemical dependency counseling.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT): An action-oriented form of therapy that assumes that maladaptive or “faulty” thought patterns cause maladaptive behaviors and “negative” emotions. Treatment focuses on changing thoughts in order to change behaviors and emotions. It is an evidence-based best practice in substance abuse treatment.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT): A therapy originally developed by Marsha Linehan, it combines standard CBT techniques with concepts of distress tolerance, acceptance, and mindfulness. It is showing some positive results in working with people with mood disorders, personality disorders, and chemical dependency. Learn more.

Health Realization (HR): A resiliency approach that focuses on the nature of thought and how it affects one’s experience of the world. Students of HR are taught that they can create their own thoughts, connect to their “inner wisdom”, and create their own experience. Learn more.

Twelve-Step Facilitation: An evidence-based practice that focuses on two goals: 1) accepting the need for abstinence from all alcohol and drugs, and 2) surrender, or the willingness to participate actively in the twelve-step communities of AA and NA.